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  • A lean and nutrient packed protein.
  • Rich in flavour whether braised, roasted or slow cooked.
  • Low in saturated fat, high in iron, zinc and vitamin B12
  • Family farm raised without the use of growth promoting hormones or steroids.

A popular 19th century dish of Russian cuisine is Veal Orloff which was created by the French chef Urbain Dubois while employed by Prince Orloff, a former Russian ambassador to France.  In this classic French dish, a veal roast is sliced and layered with a combination of soubise (onion) and duxelles (mushroom) puree, then put back together in the shape of the roast.  The dish consists of braising veal (boneless blade or shoulder roast tied), then thinly slicing and filling with a thin layer of pureed mushroom and onion stuffing between each slice, while stacking back together.

Traditionally it is covered with more puree and heavily coated with Mornay sauce (béchamel sauce and cheese), before finally glazing in the oven. For a modern twist,  keep the soubise and duxelles separate and arrange them side by side — black contrasting with white — on each veal slice, so the stuffings are visible. Use only a very thin coating of Mornay to glaze the dish, and serve the rest on the side.